Links between evolutionary theory and feminism

According to Libby Anne’s critique of Doug Phillips:

Societal acceptance of the theory of evolution did not in any way lead to feminism, nor is there any reason it should have.

But to use Anne’s rhetoric, “this quote is so out there that I have decided to dissect it”—with comments from Tina Gianquitto:

For anyone curious about the reception of evolutionary theory by women in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, Kimberly A. Hamlin’s From Eve to Evolution: Darwin, Science and Women’s Rights in Gilded Age America is mandatory reading…

Women political activists, writers, intellectuals, and scientists of the period have have been largely left out of the histories of evolutionary science in America. Yet evolutionary theory, writ large, in fact provided women’s rights activists of the Gilded Age—the Darwinian feminists—with a foundation on which to organize their calls for everything from co-education to reproductive autonomy for women.

Quote sources

  1. Anne, L. (2012). Doug Phillips on Evolution and Feminism. Patheos. Available http://www.patheos.com/blogs/lovejoyfeminism/2012/04/doug-phillips-on-evolution-and-feminism.html. Last accessed 24th Dec 2015.
  2. Gianquitto, T. (2015). From Eve to Evolution: Darwin, Science and Women’s Rights in Gilded Age America [book review] in Reports of the National Center for Science Education, Vol 32, No. 2 (2015). Available http://reports.ncse.com/index.php/rncse/article/view/363/642. Last accessed 24th Dec 2015.
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