The philosophy of science, through Christian eyes

The humanist believes this world is all there is. Life is defined chemically and physiologically, within totally naturalistic confines. They reason that if the reality of our world is entirely natural, then definition is relatively easy. Given enough time, all things can be defined after sufficient research, dissection, experimentation, or study. From a Christian perspective, this is not true. Leviticus 17:11 makes clear that life is “in the blood” but it is even more clear that life is not from the blood, but from God. (Genesis 2:7). To understand life we must look beyond life to God. Definition has to be more than naturalistic: it goes beyond us and our world, and is thus in essence impossible. For us, therefore, science is not definitive but descriptive and theological. Science will become more productive if it abandons its goal to define naturalistically (which leads to theoretical science) and limits itself to description in terms of theological premises.

Quote source

Rushdoony, R. J. (1984). A Christian Creationist View of Teaching Science. Answers in Genesis. Available. https://answersingenesis.org/creation-science/a-christian-creationist-view-of-teaching-science/. Last accessed 17th Jan 2015.

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