Social “justice” is code for force

In fact, since the program of social justice inevitably involves claims for government provision of goods, paid for through the efforts of others, the term actually refers to an intention to use force to acquire one’s desires…

As the critics of social justice are compelled to point out ad nauseam, to assert a right to some tangible good or service like clean water, healthcare, education, prenatal care, or ice cream, requires that someone else must supply that good. It asserts the moral prerogative to have others supply you with your desires, at the expense of their effort. When coupled with an appeal to government provision (as is always the intention), it asserts the moral prerogative to use force to attain one’s desires — to force others to give you their ice cream, their clean water, their medical skills, and so on. It is the principle of the thief, the rapist, the criminal, who sees his whims and desires as reason to impose himself forcibly on others…

The propaganda of “social justice” operates by cloaking desires in the language of rights, while making sure to avoid any uncomfortable mention of how these desires are to be supplied. Thus, we see on the video an asserted right to “free education.” We do not see the far more honest assertion of the right to “forcibly take money from others to pay for one’s own costly education.” No, it is “free” education that is the asserted right. But what free education is this? Free for whom?…

[Their] assertion of the right to ice cream is ridiculous, but it is no less philosophically defensible than thousands of other assertions of rights made in nightly news broadcasts and the pulpits of the world’s legislatures.

My two cents

English: Rally for social justice, Beersheba, ...
Rally for social justice, Beersheba, Aug 13 2001 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Fantastic. I’ve wanted to read an article like this for a long time.

Quote source

O’Neill, B. (2011). The Injustice of Social Justice. Available: http://mises.org/daily/5099/The-Injustice-of-Social-Justice. Last accessed 29th May 2011.

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