The salt of the earth ought not withdraw from politics

The Christian ought to be extremely interested in politics because the political issues and decisions affect him at the very core of this activity on earth.

Christians are to be the salt of the earth. We have no right to say that politics is dirty, that politicians are crooks, and that we never have a decent choice when we have done nothing to influence politics…

A handful of Christians can have a wholesome effect on politics. To withdraw and retreat from any area of God’s world is to say that God is not sovereign over that area.

Quote source

Thoburn, R.L. (1984). The Christian and Politics. 2nd edition. Thoburn Press, Tyler, pp. 19-20

Hold office and fly above compromise

You’ll have to compromise your faith to be involved with politics.” That is a common reason given by believers [not to get into politics]. I have not found this to be the case. I belong to a major political party and served in elective office. Never was I required to do anything that was contrary to my faith. More than once I was on the short end of a vote (sometimes 99-1) and my stay in elective office wasn’t long, but I never had to compromise.

Quote source

Thoburn, R.L. (1984). The Christian and Politics. 2nd edition. Thoburn Press, Tyler, p. 17

The slippery slope from liberalism to statism

In his classic work, Christianity and Liberalism, J. Gresham Machen shows that liberalism is not Christianity. It is another religion. Because it is another religion, it fosters a different political world and life view. The liberal in religion is likely to be a liberal in politics. Since he doesn’t believe in the infallibility of the Bible, the liberal finds infallibility in man. So he ends up with the state as infallible. Just as the Christian appeals to God’s Word as his final authority, the liberal appeals to the state for the authoritative ruling.

Quote source

Thoburn, R.L. (1984). The Christian and Politics. 2nd edition. Thoburn Press, Tyler, pp. 7-8

The tight link between political correctness and leftism

So there you have a baker’s dozen of politically incorrect statements…

Now what do they have in common in virtue of which they are all instances of political incorrectness? The most important common feature is that each opposes the contemporary liberal or leftist or ‘progressive’ worldview.

To be politically correct, then, is to support the leftist worldview and the leftist agenda. It follows that a conservative cannot be politically correct. P.C. comes from the C.P. The P.C. mentality is a successor form of the Communist mentality. To be politically correct is to toe the party line. It is to support leftist positions and tactics, including the suppression of the free speech rights of opponents.

Essential to leftism is the double standard. So while the politically correct insist on their own free speech rights, they deny them to their opponents, which is why they routinely shout them down.

Quote source

Vallicella, B. (2016). A Mistaken Definition of ‘Political Correctness’ and a ‘Correct’ Definition. Maverick Philosopher. Available http://maverickphilosopher.typepad.com/maverick_philosopher/2016/05/a-mistaken-definition-of-political-correctness-and-a-correct-definition.html. Last accessed 1st Jan 2017.

The sinful origin of current-day public education

In 1837, modern public education was born in Massachusetts under the influence of Horace Mann. He is revered as the “Father of modern public education.” Mann was president of the Massachusetts Legislature and chairman of the new state board of education of America’s first public school system. He was a Unitarian, who denied the Trinity and deity of Christ. He did not believe in the inspiration and authority of the Bible.

The fact that the entire educational system for all of the children of America was in the hands of the Christian Church was deplorable to him. He thought something must be done to remedy that situation. His answer was state education, education run, operated, and controlled by the state. Hence, the modern, public educational system was begun in an effort to deliver children from the Christian religion.

Quote source

Kennedy, D.J. and Newcombe, J. (2001). What if Jesus Had Never Been Born? [ebook]. Thomas Nelson, Inc, Nashville. Location 969

Christ’s kingdom as the foundation for New England

Over the course of the next 150 years, these dedicated Christians in New England wrote up about 100 different compacts, covenants, and constitutions. Like the Mayflower Compact, they reflect the Christian motivation of these early Americans. For example, in 1643, for the first time, for mutual protection, delegates from the colonies joined together and signed the New England Confederation.

Here is what they said was the singular reason for their coming into these parts of America as stated in the New England Confederation: “We all came into these parts of America, with one and the same end and aim, namely, to advance the Kingdom of our Lord Jesus Christ.”

Quote source

Kennedy, D.J. and Newcombe, J. (2001). What if Jesus Had Never Been Born? [ebook]. Thomas Nelson, Inc, Nashville. Location 1155.

The societal fruits of private and Christian education

For 217 years—from 1620, when the Pilgrims landed, until 1837—virtually all education in America was private and Christian. (The public educational system is only 150 years old.) The basis of America lay with private and Christian education.

What was the result of over 200 years of private Christian education? Education historian Lawrence A. Cremin, who has written several books about American education, has concluded that literacy rates among American whites were as high or higher than in provincial England and significantly above those in Ireland:

At a time when estimates of adult male literacy in England ran from 48 percent in the rural western midlands to 74 percent in the towns, on the basis of signatures on marriage registers, adult male literacy in the American colonies seems to have run from 70 percent to virtually 100 percent, on the basis of signatures on deeds and wills, militia rolls and voting registers.

Quote source

Kennedy, D.J. and Newcombe, J. (2001). What if Jesus Had Never Been Born? [ebook]. Thomas Nelson, Inc, Nashville. Location 892.